Roe v. Wade: U.S. Supreme Court – Lawyers Present Oral Arguments (1971) – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973), is a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court on the issue of abortion. More on the topic: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=mg03-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=7e1f3f3b49a4eebefe522570108d2cf9&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=roe%20wade

Decided simultaneously with a companion case, Doe v. Bolton, the Court ruled 7–2 that a right to privacy under the due process clause of the 14th Amendment extended to a woman’s decision to have an abortion, but that right must be balanced against the state’s two legitimate interests in regulating abortions: protecting prenatal life and protecting women’s health. Arguing that these state interests became stronger over the course of a pregnancy, the Court resolved this balancing test by tying state regulation of abortion to the trimester of pregnancy.

The Court later rejected Roe’s trimester framework, while affirming Roe’s central holding that a person has a right to abortion until viability. The Roe decision defined “viable” as being “potentially able to live outside the mother’s womb, albeit with artificial aid”, adding that viability “is usually placed at about seven months (28 weeks) but may occur earlier, even at 24 weeks.”

In disallowing many state and federal restrictions on abortion in the United States, Roe v. Wade prompted a national debate that continues today, about issues including whether and to what extent abortion should be legal, who should decide the legality of abortion, what methods the Supreme Court should use in constitutional adjudication, and what the role should be of religious and moral views in the political sphere. Roe v. Wade reshaped national politics, dividing much of the United States into pro-choice and pro-life camps, while activating grassroots movements on both sides.

According to the Court, “the restrictive criminal abortion laws in effect in a majority of States today are of relatively recent vintage.” In 1821, Connecticut passed the first state statute criminalizing abortion. Every state had abortion legislation by 1900.[5] In the United States, abortion was sometimes considered a common law crime,[6] though Justice Blackmun would conclude that the criminalization of abortion did not have “roots in the English common-law tradition.”[7]

Prior history of the case

In June 1969, Norma L. McCorvey discovered she was pregnant with her third child. She returned to Dallas, Texas, where friends advised her to assert falsely that she had been raped in order to obtain a legal abortion (with the understanding that Texas law allowed abortion in cases of rape and incest). However, this scheme failed because there was no police report documenting the alleged rape. She attempted to obtain an illegal abortion, but found the unauthorized site had been closed down by the police. Eventually, she was referred to attorneys Linda Coffee and Sarah Weddington.[8] (McCorvey would give birth before the case was decided.)

In 1970, Coffee and Weddington filed suit in a U.S. District Court in Texas on behalf of McCorvey (under the alias Jane Roe). The defendant in the case was Dallas County District Attorney Henry Wade, representing the State of Texas. McCorvey was no longer claiming her pregnancy was the result of rape, and later acknowledged that she had lied about having been raped.[9][10] “Rape” is not mentioned in the judicial opinions in this case.[11]

The district court ruled in McCorvey’s favor on the legal merits of her case, and declined to grant an injunction against the enforcement of the laws barring abortion.[11] The district court’s decision was based upon the 9th Amendment, and the court relied upon a concurring opinion by Justice Arthur Goldberg in the 1965 Supreme Court case of Griswold v. Connecticut,[12] finding in the decision for a right to privacy.[13]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roe_v_wade
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Susan Filan- Casey Anthony, Casey Goes Free- MSNBC Hardball (07-07-11) – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Weston, Connecticut native Susan F. Filan, Esq., is a former CT state prosecutor, MSNBC-TV Senior Legal Analyst and an experienced trial lawyer.
She currently runs a legal practice at Colonial Green in Westport, Connecticut, representing clients in criminal matters and family cases as well as mediating matters for clients. Filan comes at her profession from a paradoxically spiritual, yet pragmatic and iron fisted view point, putting into her daily practice what she takes from her own heart and experience. Versatile and more humane than her remarkable credentials would suggest, Filan has much to offer clients who face real challenge in their lives.

Filan began her career in 1991 at a New Haven legal aid clinic, representing indigent criminal defendants. In 1994, she joined a private firm and practiced criminal defense, divorce law, and family matters at both the trial and appellate level in both state and federal courts. In 1998, she was appointed Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney in the Gang and Continuing Crime Unit for the state of Connecticut and later became an Assistant State’s Attorney in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Dynamic change is something Attorney Filan knows about. In May 2005, she resigned her prominent position as a Connecticut state prosecutor to pursue a career in media after being hired by NBC News and MSNBC to provide exclusive legal analysis at the Michael Jackson trial in Santa Maria, Calif.

She soon became NBC News’ go-to legal analyst, often appearing on “The Today Show,” and other cable news programs. In 2006, she was promoted to MSNBC Senior Legal Analyst. She has shared her insights on dozens of high profile cases — from JonBenet Ramsey and Anna Nicole Smith, to O.J. Simpson and Kobe Bryant, to Bernie Madoff, David Letterman and Tiger Woods.
She has appeared on every major network, including NBC’s “Today Show,” CBS’s “The Early Show,” ABC’s “Good Morning America,” “Dateline” and “Nightly News with Brian Williams,” MSNBC’s “The Dan Abrams Report,” CNN’s “Larry King Live,” Fox News LIVE, Court TV (now truTV), BBC TV and Radio, and National Public Radio. She has been quoted in printed media around the world.

Attorney Filan grew up in Weston, Connecticut, in a family of lawyers. Her father is retired state Appellate Court Judge Frederick A. Freedman, her uncle is retired U.S. District Court Judge Alan Nevas. Her great uncle, Leo Nevas, was something of a local legend in Westport, practicing law until he passed away in August 2009 at the age of 97. She is proud that her conference room was his original office over fifty years ago.

She has two daughters, adopted from China.

Susan Filan- Jared Loughner-Gabrielle Giffords- Jansing & Company (05-26-11) – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Weston, Connecticut native Susan F. Filan, Esq., is a former CT state prosecutor, MSNBC-TV Senior Legal Analyst and an experienced trial lawyer.
She currently runs a legal practice at Colonial Green in Westport, Connecticut, representing clients in criminal matters and family cases as well as mediating matters for clients. Filan comes at her profession from a paradoxically spiritual, yet pragmatic and iron fisted view point, putting into her daily practice what she takes from her own heart and experience. Versatile and more humane than her remarkable credentials would suggest, Filan has much to offer clients who face real challenge in their lives.

Filan began her career in 1991 at a New Haven legal aid clinic, representing indigent criminal defendants. In 1994, she joined a private firm and practiced criminal defense, divorce law, and family matters at both the trial and appellate level in both state and federal courts. In 1998, she was appointed Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney in the Gang and Continuing Crime Unit for the state of Connecticut and later became an Assistant State’s Attorney in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Dynamic change is something Attorney Filan knows about. In May 2005, she resigned her prominent position as a Connecticut state prosecutor to pursue a career in media after being hired by NBC News and MSNBC to provide exclusive legal analysis at the Michael Jackson trial in Santa Maria, Calif.

She soon became NBC News’ go-to legal analyst, often appearing on “The Today Show,” and other cable news programs. In 2006, she was promoted to MSNBC Senior Legal Analyst. She has shared her insights on dozens of high profile cases — from JonBenet Ramsey and Anna Nicole Smith, to O.J. Simpson and Kobe Bryant, to Bernie Madoff, David Letterman and Tiger Woods.
She has appeared on every major network, including NBC’s “Today Show,” CBS’s “The Early Show,” ABC’s “Good Morning America,” “Dateline” and “Nightly News with Brian Williams,” MSNBC’s “The Dan Abrams Report,” CNN’s “Larry King Live,” Fox News LIVE, Court TV (now truTV), BBC TV and Radio, and National Public Radio. She has been quoted in printed media around the world.

Attorney Filan grew up in Weston, Connecticut, in a family of lawyers. Her father is retired state Appellate Court Judge Frederick A. Freedman, her uncle is retired U.S. District Court Judge Alan Nevas. Her great uncle, Leo Nevas, was something of a local legend in Westport, practicing law until he passed away in August 2009 at the age of 97. She is proud that her conference room was his original office over fifty years ago.

She has two daughters, adopted from China.
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The Senate Reports with Senator Eric Coleman – 5/29/2015 – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

State Senator Eric D. Coleman began serving the Second Senatorial District in January, 1995. The district includes portions of Bloomfield, Hartford and Windsor. Prior to his election to the Senate, he served in the State House of Representatives from 1983 to 1994. While a member of the House of Representatives, Senator Coleman served two terms as Assistant Majority Leader. In 1991, he served a term as Majority Whip, and was Deputy Speaker of the House in 1993.

Senator Coleman currently serves as Senate Chair of the General Assembly’s Judiciary Committee. He is also the Vice Chair of the Human Services Committee, and a sitting member of the General Law and Program Review & Investigations Committees. He also acts as Deputy President Pro Tempore, often presiding over business on the floor of the Senate.

Senator Coleman made history in 2001 when he was first appointed to serve as Chair of the Judiciary Committee—the first African-American to hold that position. The George W. Crawford Law Association, an organization of African-American lawyers in Connecticut, and a number of civil rights organizations honored him for his contributions to the legal profession.

Senator Coleman has received numerous awards and honors since he was first elected to the Senate in 1994. In 2001 the African-American Affairs Commission named Coleman “Legislator of the Year.” The Legislative Education Action Program (L.E.A.P) honored him in 2000 for his work on the law requiring all cities and towns in Connecticut to observe Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Senator Coleman has also been honored by the Connecticut Citizen Action Group for his commitment to social change, the Urban League of Greater Hartford Development Corporation, the Appreciation Award for support of the Annual Dr. Carter G. Woodson Scholarship of Tau Iota Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, the Greater Hartford NAACP, the Uptown Troops Color Guard, the United Negro College Fund, the Unsung Hero Award of the Upper Albany Revitalization Zone Organization, the Greater Hartford Labor Council AFL-CIO, the Connecticut Alliance for Basic Human Needs, the Nigerian American Society, the Clarence Daniels Advocacy Award of the Connecticut AIDS Residence Coalition, and the Achievement Award of the Connecticut Chapter of Men and Women for Justice, Inc.

Senator Coleman serves on the Board of Directors of Greater Hartford Legal Aid and is a member of the American Bar Association as well as the Hartford County Bar Association. He is a member of Metropolitan A.M.E. Zion Church and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated, and also served on the Bloomfield Democratic Town Committee from 1984 to 2002.

Senator Coleman graduated from the Pomfret School and Columbia College of Columbia University. He received his J.D. from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1977 and established his own law practice in Hartford in 1986.

Senator Coleman resides in Bloomfield with his wife, Pamela. They have three children: Trevonn, Lamar and Erica, and three grandchildren: Jalen, Isaiah and Elias.

Watch it on AccessTV.org or GO Mobile • Share it with Colleagues, family, friends, and foe, that way you can help keep them in the know.

The AccessTV.org Network is Funded by J. Stan and Nyesha McCauley. Additional support made possible by community volunteers.

Help me make more fresh quality content. Every contribution is helpful, big or small. Click to Support: http://accesstv.org/archives/3628
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Tina’s parents were severely injured in a car accident – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

The video above is a testimonial regarding the work of Trantolo & Trantolo, a Connecticut based Personal Injury Law Firm. The family had no hope, Tina’s parents had been severely injured by a drunk driver. They needed the legal experience of Trantolo and Trantolo. With legal aid they received compensation for the accident. It covered all of the bills and allowed them to keep their home.

The Senate Reports with Senator Eric Coleman – 7/31/2015 – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

The Senate Reports with Senator Eric Coleman - 7/31/2015

State Senator Eric D. Coleman began serving the Second Senatorial District in January, 1995. The district includes portions of Bloomfield, Hartford and Windsor. Prior to his election to the Senate, he served in the State House of Representatives from 1983 to 1994. While a member of the House of Representatives, Senator Coleman served two terms as Assistant Majority Leader. In 1991, he served a term as Majority Whip, and was Deputy Speaker of the House in 1993.

Senator Coleman currently serves as Senate Chair of the General Assembly’s Judiciary Committee. He is also the Vice Chair of the Human Services Committee, and a sitting member of the General Law and Program Review & Investigations Committees. He also acts as Deputy President Pro Tempore, often presiding over business on the floor of the Senate.

Senator Coleman made history in 2001 when he was first appointed to serve as Chair of the Judiciary Committee—the first African-American to hold that position. The George W. Crawford Law Association, an organization of African-American lawyers in Connecticut, and a number of civil rights organizations honored him for his contributions to the legal profession.

Senator Coleman has received numerous awards and honors since he was first elected to the Senate in 1994. In 2001 the African-American Affairs Commission named Coleman “Legislator of the Year.” The Legislative Education Action Program (L.E.A.P) honored him in 2000 for his work on the law requiring all cities and towns in Connecticut to observe Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Senator Coleman has also been honored by the Connecticut Citizen Action Group for his commitment to social change, the Urban League of Greater Hartford Development Corporation, the Appreciation Award for support of the Annual Dr. Carter G. Woodson Scholarship of Tau Iota Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, the Greater Hartford NAACP, the Uptown Troops Color Guard, the United Negro College Fund, the Unsung Hero Award of the Upper Albany Revitalization Zone Organization, the Greater Hartford Labor Council AFL-CIO, the Connecticut Alliance for Basic Human Needs, the Nigerian American Society, the Clarence Daniels Advocacy Award of the Connecticut AIDS Residence Coalition, and the Achievement Award of the Connecticut Chapter of Men and Women for Justice, Inc.

Senator Coleman serves on the Board of Directors of Greater Hartford Legal Aid and is a member of the American Bar Association as well as the Hartford County Bar Association. He is a member of Metropolitan A.M.E. Zion Church and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated, and also served on the Bloomfield Democratic Town Committee from 1984 to 2002.

Senator Coleman graduated from the Pomfret School and Columbia College of Columbia University. He received his J.D. from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1977 and established his own law practice in Hartford in 1986.

Senator Coleman resides in Bloomfield with his wife, Pamela. They have three children: Trevonn, Lamar and Erica, and three grandchildren: Jalen, Isaiah and Elias.

Watch it on AccessTV.org or GO Mobile • Share it with Colleagues, family, friends, and foe, that way you can help keep them in the know.

The AccessTV.org Network is Funded by J. Stan and Nyesha McCauley. Additional support made possible by community volunteers.

Help me make more fresh quality content. Every contribution is helpful, big or small. Click to Support: http://accesstv.org/archives/3628
Get our Mobile App: http://mob.accesstv.org/

Be a force for good! If you can’t save the world – save someone that can!

Thanks for Watching!
J. Stan McCauley
www.Jstan1.net

Interactive Criminal Law Video (clip) – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Overview of Major Topics Covered:
Punishment; Statutes; Actus Reus; Mens Rea; General Intent; Specific Intent; Model Penal Code; Causation; Murder; Voluntary Manslaughter; Involuntary Manslaughter; Reckless Murder; Negligence; Felony Murder; Merger; Rape; Battery; Assault; Mayhem; Kidnapping; Negative Defenses; Affirmative Defenses; Defense of Others; Defense of Habitation/Property; Law Enforcement Defense; Necessity; Duress; Voluntary Intoxication; Involuntary Intoxication; Insanity; Entrapment; Inchoate Offenses; Attempt; Solicitation; Conspiracy; Accomplice Liability; Abandonment; Larceny; Larceny by Trick; Robbery; Burglary; Embezzlement; Receipt of Stolen Property; False Pretenses; Extortion; Claim of Right

About the Professor:
Professor McCormack is the Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs at the University of Michigan Law School and is a clinical professor with the Michigan Clinical Law Program, where she teaches a criminal defense clinic, a domestic violence clinic, and a pediatric advocacy clinic. Before joining the faculty, Professor McCormack was a Robert M. Cover Fellow at Yale Law School. She earned her law degree from New York University School of Law where she was a Root-Tilden scholar, and her B.A., with honors in political science and philosophy, from Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut. She has worked as a staff attorney with the Office of the Appellate Defender and was a senior trial attorney with the Criminal Defense Division of the Legal Aid Society, both in New York City. McCormack has been published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review and co-authored the Criminal Defense Motions Book for the State Appellate Defender’s Office. McCormack’s current clinical practice, as well as her research and scholarship, focuses on criminal charging issues.
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Do Kids Have Rights in School? – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Do Kids Have Rights in School?

Adapted from Your Child’s Rights in School, by the CT Network for Legal Aid: http://ctlawhelp.org/your-childs-rights-in-school
This video and Your Child’s Rights in School will only give you general information about the law: that’s not the same as getting legal advice about your own situation. If you want to talk with someone about a legal problem or think you may need the services of an attorney, call the toll-free Statewide Legal Services Hotline: 1-800-453-3320
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Susan Filan- Casey Anthony Not Guilty- MSNBC Hardball (07-05-11) – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

Weston, Connecticut native Susan F. Filan, Esq., is a former CT state prosecutor, MSNBC-TV Senior Legal Analyst and an experienced trial lawyer.
She currently runs a legal practice at Colonial Green in Westport, Connecticut, representing clients in criminal matters and family cases as well as mediating matters for clients. Filan comes at her profession from a paradoxically spiritual, yet pragmatic and iron fisted view point, putting into her daily practice what she takes from her own heart and experience. Versatile and more humane than her remarkable credentials would suggest, Filan has much to offer clients who face real challenge in their lives.

Filan began her career in 1991 at a New Haven legal aid clinic, representing indigent criminal defendants. In 1994, she joined a private firm and practiced criminal defense, divorce law, and family matters at both the trial and appellate level in both state and federal courts. In 1998, she was appointed Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney in the Office of the Chief State’s Attorney in the Gang and Continuing Crime Unit for the state of Connecticut and later became an Assistant State’s Attorney in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

Dynamic change is something Attorney Filan knows about. In May 2005, she resigned her prominent position as a Connecticut state prosecutor to pursue a career in media after being hired by NBC News and MSNBC to provide exclusive legal analysis at the Michael Jackson trial in Santa Maria, Calif.

She soon became NBC News’ go-to legal analyst, often appearing on “The Today Show,” and other cable news programs. In 2006, she was promoted to MSNBC Senior Legal Analyst. She has shared her insights on dozens of high profile cases — from JonBenet Ramsey and Anna Nicole Smith, to O.J. Simpson and Kobe Bryant, to Bernie Madoff, David Letterman and Tiger Woods.
She has appeared on every major network, including NBC’s “Today Show,” CBS’s “The Early Show,” ABC’s “Good Morning America,” “Dateline” and “Nightly News with Brian Williams,” MSNBC’s “The Dan Abrams Report,” CNN’s “Larry King Live,” Fox News LIVE, Court TV (now truTV), BBC TV and Radio, and National Public Radio. She has been quoted in printed media around the world.

Attorney Filan grew up in Weston, Connecticut, in a family of lawyers. Her father is retired state Appellate Court Judge Frederick A. Freedman, her uncle is retired U.S. District Court Judge Alan Nevas. Her great uncle, Leo Nevas, was something of a local legend in Westport, practicing law until he passed away in August 2009 at the age of 97. She is proud that her conference room was his original office over fifty years ago.

She has two daughters, adopted from China.
Video Rating: / 5