Part 3. Legal Aid: Bankruptcy – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

Part 3. Legal Aid: Bankruptcy

Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada and the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have partnered for over 10 years to provide free legal information to members of our community. Boyd students, supervised by attorneys, teach informational classes covering Small Claims, Bankruptcy, Guardianship, Foreclosure Mediation, Paternity/Custody and Family Law matters and help self-represented litigants understand how to present their cases and represent themselves in court.

Since 1998 over 30,000 people have benefitted from attending these free classes.

The video on this website of the Bankruptcy class was generously produced by the staff of Vegas PBS. For a copy of the manual that accompanies this class, please go to www.lacsn.org/free-classes and click on the Bankruptcy link.

For more information on the other free legal education classes, please visit www.lacsn.org.
Video Rating: / 5

No Shave, No Make Up November for Fathers Rights Awareness – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

No Shave,  No Make Up November for Fathers Rights Awareness

Starting this November Paternal Guardians of Iowa is declaring the month of November Father’s Rights Awareness month. We want to use this month to raise awareness of the injustices that fathers are force to endure and go through to gain the most basics of parental rights.

Recently I have had a conversation with an individual who is currently fighting against these injustices of the legal system. His story is a perfect example of just how unfair and unbalance the system really is for fathers. His son is currently two months old and he hasn’t yet been able to see him. When his son was born the mother immediately gave him up for adoption and would end up leaving the hospital with the adoption agency. Upon hearing the news of his child being born the father fought for a DNA test and when the results came back he was indeed the father. After finding out the results the adoption agency return the child to the mother, which she would end up returning the child to the family who is now trying to privately adopt him. Now that family has continued to refuse to give the child to his father and has petition the juvenile court to terminate the fathers’ rights to the child. At the end of the month the father has to appear in court and ask the judge to simply not terminate his right to being a father to his son. Even if the court rules in favor of him he will still not have any rights or visitation with his son until he is able to return to district court for a temporary hearing on custody.

Our mission here at Paternal Guardians of Iowa is advocating for fathers that are going through situations just like this one. We are their voice and we are raising awareness by making sure their stories are being told. For the future, we will not only be their voice but also their support system and providing direct aid to help level the playing field. In order to achieve both of goals and continue to grow we have to start fundraising. So, for our first annual fundraising we present No Shave, No Make-up November.

Here’s how it works:

Gentlemen, starting on Nov 1st you will pledge a dollar amount for the amount of days you are going to go without shaving and are encourage to share daily photos on our Facebook page. Then the fun begins with you cash challenging someone else to do the same. For example, I am pledging .00 for all 30 days of November I plan on going without shaving. I am also challenging my best friends Cain that if he can go 2 weeks without shaving I will donate additional to Paternal Guardians of Iowa.

Ladies, starting on Nov 1st you will pledge a dollar amount for the amount of days you are going to go without wearing make-up and are encourage to share daily photos on our Facebook page. The cash challenge part remains the same as it is with the gentlemen. Anyone can challenge anyone, so not just ladies can challenge ladies etc.

Prizes, For the gentlemen we have three gift cards to Pancheros. They will go to the winners of each of the following categories; highest donor, longest beard, and most pathetic beard. For the ladies, we have three gift cards to Cold Stone Creamery. They will go to the winner of each of the following categories; highest donor, most consecutive days without make-up, and most total days without wearing make-up (does not have to be consecutive).

Grand Prize, now for the individual who is the highest donor will get the privilege of cutting Nick Shrimer’s beard off. For those of you who do not know him he has been growing this beard for years and he has graciously offered it up to help raise awareness for Father’s Rights! Google Zztop and that is what you will have the honor of snipping off.

Here’s the link to our GoFundMe page to donate to Paternal Guardians of Iowa.
https://www.gofundme.com/fathers-rights-awareness-2vb6jpuk

If you would like a receipt please provide me with your address and amount donated by sending me an email at rknapp.paternalguardians@gmail.com

Thanks for all the support!

Making Legal Aid Work – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

YES- IT DOES MAKE IT WORK!

THIS IS THE ONLY SINGLE-VOLUME COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THE LEGAL AID SCHEME CURRENTLY AVAILABLE TO HELP THE NEW AND THE EXPERIENCED PRACTITIONER

An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE and Elizabeth Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers

There is much to be commended with this excellent new publication from the Legal Action Group (LAG) filling the gap left as a successor to the annual Legal Aid Handbook no longer in print.

Of course, LAG specializes in those controversial areas of law of deepest concern to the general public with their problems as well as practitioners who deal with them. LAG is at the forefront this year with one of the most important contemporary issues of the moment- legal aid desperately in need of modern reform during an economic downturn.

Vicky Ling and Simon Pugh assert, quite rightly, that legal aid is fundamental to the operation of a democratic society. And the authors quote Lord Bingham who said equality before the law is a pretence if some citizens can assert and protect their rights and others cannot; that the rule of law to be meaningful, must ensure that justice is available to all, irrespective of means. This 300 page paperback gives us all a hand in making this scheme work in 21st century.

Ling & Pugh pointed out at their book launch that, significantly, 2009 marks the 60th anniversary of the Legal Aid and Assistance Act 1949 which created legal aid. It also, inevitably, created the complex and unwieldy bureaucratic apparatus that administers and supports it: the Legal Services Commissions Manual at 1,000 pages long and great for somnambulists.

What we have tried to do in this book, say the authors, is provide a practical guide to all the various elements that make up legal aid in one volume. They do just that with Part A covering Doing Legal Aid Work which aims to take lawyers and caseworkers through the rules and regulations that govern the criminal, civil and family schemes, illustrated by case studies, with references to primary sources.

Part B covers Managing Legal Aid Work and provides directors, managers and administrators with advice and guidance on keeping contracts and likely future developments.

The book covers both the civil and criminal legal aid schemes. The word comprehensive is much used these days, but it is a fair statement of the detail and usefulness of this book with its excellent case studies which have the practical content we so desperately need as practitioners in the system.

So, we sum it up by saying, yes, they do make it work for us and, as a footnote, we used it the other day on an intricate legal aid point, using the index, then the appendices and the body copy to track down some advice found very quickly. As Ling & Pugh said to us, lets hope it fills the vacant gap left by the demise of the old handbookand we know it will as it is highly user-friendly.

ISBN: 978-1-903307-68-7

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJqqCs3UsWM

Sound Advice: Legal Aid for Veterans and Defendants in Debt Collection – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

According to U.S. Census Bureau data, about 123,000 D.C. residents — that’s one in five — are living in poverty. Chief among the reasons why so many DC residents live in poverty is a constricted job market due to the great recession. In addition, some people are not able to work because of physical or mental disabilities.  And many of our neighbors who are struggling with poverty are veterans, people who have served our country.

That’s where the Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia comes in.  Through the generous support of Equal Justice Works Americorps and the Skadden Fellowship Foundation, Legal Aid has been able to work on a broader range of poverty-related problems in DC by hiring two attorney fellows. 

Dean Shelley Broderick of the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law interviews Ashley Waddell Tingstad, Skadden Fellow who works to protect District residents from unfair and deceptive debt collection practices and Nina Wu, Equal Justice Works Americorps Legal Fellow who represents veterans who have been wrongfully denied government benefits.

Combs, Carmen – Audio Oral History Interview – CSWA – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

Interviewed by Elizabeth McBroom on August 14, 1990.

An interview with Carmen Combs as she discusses her early childhood in Iowa; graduation from Yale School of Law in 1927; early law practice; work at USC in Legal Aid Clinic; work with “Okie” families; referee in juvenile courts in Los Angeles area; House of Good Shepherd and Boys Republic; detention of children at McClaren Hall; appointment from Earl Warren to city’s advisory committee; career with League of Women Voters and issues addressed; involvement with grand jury investigations; “Woman of the Year” award; volunteer for Pasadena School District; work with League of Women Voters and its involvement with migrant workers; philosophy as working mother; changes in child welfare and lives of children; effectiveness of social welfare agencies in working with juvenile delinquents; opinion of probation officers.

Carmen Combs was an attorney who spent a number of years as a referee in the Juvenile Court of Los Angeles. She also was an active volunteer in various committees and organizations that focused on juvenile justice and related issues. Among her activities was work with the Legal Aid Society, Los Angeles; the University of Southern California Center on Law and Poverty; the Governor’s (Warren) Committee on Juvenile Justice; the League of Women Voters; and the Boys’ and Girls’ Republic. This interview describes some of her activities in these organizations.

To view a transcript of the interview, visit https://libraries.usc.edu/california-social-welfare-archives-oral-history-catalog

The California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA), established in 1979, is a non-profit organization operating under the auspices of the USC School of Social Work and affiliated with the University Libraries. It collects and preserves documents and personal histories of significant contributions to the evolution of social welfare ensuring their availability to future generations — students, teachers, historians, and researchers. Collection activity includes gathering and archiving social welfare materials of historical significance, conducting oral history interviews with contributors to social welfare solutions in California, and creating events to publicly recognize significant contributors to California social welfare.

Visit us at http://www.usc.edu/libraries/archives/arc/libraries/cswa and http://www.socialworkhallofdistinction.org. The California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA), established in 1979, is a non-profit organization operating under the auspices of the USC School of Social Work and affiliated with the University Libraries. It collects and preserves documents and personal histories of significant contributors to the evolution of social welfare ensuring their availability to future generations – students, teachers, historians, and researchers. Collection activity includes gathering, preserving, and making available social welfare materials of historical significance, conducting oral history interviews with contributors to social welfare solutions in California, and creating events to publicly recognize significant contributors to California social welfare.

Visit us at http://www.usc.edu/cswa and http://www.socialworkhallofdistinction.org