Santa Clarita Woman Fights To Die With Dignity — Christy O’Donnell On KHTS – Santa Clarita – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

Santa Clarita Woman Fights To Die With Dignity -- Christy O'Donnell On KHTS - Santa Clarita

http://www.hometownstation.com/santa-clarita-latest-news/santa-clarita-woman-fights-for-right-to-die-with-dignity-judge-dismisses-suit-157457 Santa Clarita Woman Fights To Die With Dignity — Christy O’Donnell On KHTS – Santa Clarita

A Santa Clarita woman leading the fight for the right to die with dignity, has vowed to appeal a California judge’s dismissal of a suit asserting the California constitution and state law allow terminally ill adults the option of medical aid in dying.

Compassion & Choices has won two similar suits asserting state law and/or state constitution allow medical aid in dying in Montana in 2009 and New Mexico in 2014. Compassion & Choices is providing legal advice in a similar, current suit filed in Tennessee.

The terminally ill lead plaintiff in the California suit, Valencia resident Christy O’Donnell, a Christian, Republican, single mom, civil rights attorney and former LAPD sergeant, is dying from brain, liver, lung, rib, and spine cancer. Christy cried after she watched the judge announce the dismissal of the case at end of the hearing.

“This is not the outcome I had prayed for, but as a lawyer, I am confident the appeals court will see our case in a different light,” said O’Donnell, who turned 47 Friday and lives in Santa Clarita with her 21-year-old daughter, Bailey. “I don’t have much time left to live and that is why I support all end-of-life options, whether they are authorized by litigation or legislation. These options are urgent for me.”

The ruling came a few weeks after Superior Court Judge Gregory Pollack granted the plaintiffs’ motion to expedite review of the case because doctors say O’Donnell, who is morphine intolerant, is likely to die in agony within a few months if she cannot utilize medical aid in dying.

Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/KHTSRadio

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/khtsam

Twitter: http://twitter.com/khtsam1220

Santa Clarita News at http://hometownstation.com/

Santa Clarita Woman Fights To Die With Dignity — Christy O’Donnell On KHTS – Santa Clarita

Video Rating: / 5

2000 Hall of Fame: Dill, Torres, Crawford: Part 2 – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

2000 Hall of Fame, College of Business, NMSU

Julie A. Dill (’81)

Julie A. Dill received her bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1981. She graduated summa cum laude, with a major in finance.

She is currently the Senior Vice President of Planning and Finance and Chief Financial Officer for Duke Energy International in Houston, Texas. She is responsible for all economic and strategic analysis, planning and all aspects of financial and management accounting and reporting for the international development and asset management unit of Duke Energy.

Before joining Duke in 1998, she worked in various areas of Shell Oil Company.

Ralph G. Torres (’67)

Ralph G. Torres received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1967 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver College of Law in 1970.

He is currently an Attorney at Law in Denver with expertise in employment and labor discrimination and administrative law. Since 1986 he has represented both claimants and management in state and federal courts in Colorado and before state and federal regulatory agencies.

He has worked previously for the Denver district office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Adams County Legal Aid Society.

W. Everett Crawford (’70)

W. Everett Crawford received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1970.

He has worked in the banking and financial field for 29 years. He is currently the Executive Vice President of First National Bank and President and managing Officer of its Mesilla Branch.

Prior to his affiliation with First National in 1996, he spent 20 years at Citizens Bank of Las Cruces, serving eight years as President and Chief Executive Officer.

Water Transfers & Water Banking – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

In 2003, two state laws were passed affecting acequias. One was the water transfer law, which gave acequia commissions the duty to regulate acequia water transfers. This law allows acequias to determine whether or not the transfer would be detrimental to the overall well being of the community and render a decision accordingly.

The other law that passed in 2003 was the water banking law, which allows acequias to set up a “water bank” in which parciantes can temporarily add their water rights to the Acequia’s water bank. This law was enacted in order to prevent loss of acequia water rights from non-use.

These two topics were discussed in depth at this workshop. Attorney David Benavides, New Mexico Legal Aid, presented information about these laws and how they affect acequias.
Video Rating: / 5

2000 Hall of Fame: Dill, Torres, Crawford: Part 3 – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

2000 Hall of Fame, College of Business, NMSU

Julie A. Dill (’81)

Julie A. Dill received her bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1981. She graduated summa cum laude, with a major in finance.

She is currently the Senior Vice President of Planning and Finance and Chief Financial Officer for Duke Energy International in Houston, Texas. She is responsible for all economic and strategic analysis, planning and all aspects of financial and management accounting and reporting for the international development and asset management unit of Duke Energy.

Before joining Duke in 1998, she worked in various areas of Shell Oil Company.

Ralph G. Torres (’67)

Ralph G. Torres received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1967 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver College of Law in 1970.

He is currently an Attorney at Law in Denver with expertise in employment and labor discrimination and administrative law. Since 1986 he has represented both claimants and management in state and federal courts in Colorado and before state and federal regulatory agencies.

He has worked previously for the Denver district office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Adams County Legal Aid Society.

W. Everett Crawford (’70)

W. Everett Crawford received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1970.

He has worked in the banking and financial field for 29 years. He is currently the Executive Vice President of First National Bank and President and managing Officer of its Mesilla Branch.

Prior to his affiliation with First National in 1996, he spent 20 years at Citizens Bank of Las Cruces, serving eight years as President and Chief Executive Officer.
Video Rating: / 5

http://www.legalbistro.com Retain best personal injury attorney Anahuac Texas.
If you are looking to retain an attorney in Anahuac, Texas to handle your personal injury, our video will help you to better understand how to choose the right law firm for your case.

In our video we are glad to help you understand Comparative Fault Systems better!

The concept of negligence was developed under English Law and emerged as an independent cause of action in the 18th Century. Negligence is defined as “Conduct that falls below the standards of behavior established by law for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of harm”.

Comparative Fault Systems fall into three basic types:

1. Contributory
2. Pure
3. Modified Negligence

Let us introduce some Rules and explain how they work:

a) Pure Contributory Negligence Rule – a damaged party CANNOT recover ANY damages if they are EVEN 1% AT FAULT. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Only five (5) states (Alabama, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia) recognize the Pure Contributory Negligence Rule.

b) Pure Comparative Fault Rule — a damaged party is permitted to recover even if they are 99% at fault. Under this rule, the amount of the recovery would be reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Thirteen (13) states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington) recognize the Pure Comparative Fault Rule.

c) Modified Comparative Fault Rule — there are two different applications of this rule:

50% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 50% or more at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Eleven (11) states (Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) follow the 50% Bar Rule.

51% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 51% or more at fault but can recover if they are 50% or less at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Twenty-One (21) states (Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) follow the 51% Bar Rule.

Need help to figure this all out? For more specific information concerning YOUR case we advise you to address a qualified attorney in the state in which your accident occurred. Search for help on Legal Bistro http://www.legalbistro.com! The service is 100% free for consumers and you remain anonymous throughout the entire process of finding the right lawyer.

Visit our blog on http://blog.legalbistro.com/
See us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legalbistropage
See us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/blogLegalBistro
See us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=211696188&authType=name&authToken=FnxO&trk=wvmx-profile-title
See us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/104548476571730466746/posts
Watch our “Why Consumers Love legal Bistro” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdeffI-LJXs
Watch our “Legal Bistro – How It Works” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0rvFx-C66g

Legal Assistance Most Popular Personal Injury Attorney Farmers Branch Texas – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

http://www.legalbistro.com Find experienced personal injury law firm Farmers Branch Texas.
If you are looking to need an attorney in Farmers Branch, Texas to handle your personal injury, our video will help you to better understand how to choose the right law firm for your case.

In our video we are glad to help you understand Comparative Fault Systems better!

The concept of negligence was developed under English Law and emerged as an independent cause of action in the 18th Century. Negligence is defined as “Conduct that falls below the standards of behavior established by law for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of harm”.

Comparative Fault Systems fall into three basic types:

1. Contributory
2. Pure
3. Modified Negligence

Let us introduce some Rules and explain how they work:

a) Pure Contributory Negligence Rule – a damaged party CANNOT recover ANY damages if they are EVEN 1% AT FAULT. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Only five (5) states (Alabama, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia) recognize the Pure Contributory Negligence Rule.

b) Pure Comparative Fault Rule — a damaged party is permitted to recover even if they are 99% at fault. Under this rule, the amount of the recovery would be reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Thirteen (13) states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington) recognize the Pure Comparative Fault Rule.

c) Modified Comparative Fault Rule — there are two different applications of this rule:

50% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 50% or more at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Eleven (11) states (Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) follow the 50% Bar Rule.

51% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 51% or more at fault but can recover if they are 50% or less at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Twenty-One (21) states (Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) follow the 51% Bar Rule.

Need help to figure this all out? For more specific information concerning YOUR case we advise you to address a qualified attorney in the state in which your accident occurred. Search for help on Legal Bistro http://www.legalbistro.com! The service is 100% free for consumers and you remain anonymous throughout the entire process of finding the right lawyer.

Visit our blog on http://blog.legalbistro.com/
See us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legalbistropage
See us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/blogLegalBistro
See us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=211696188&authType=name&authToken=FnxO&trk=wvmx-profile-title
See us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/104548476571730466746/posts
Watch our “Why Consumers Love legal Bistro” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdeffI-LJXs
Watch our “Legal Bistro – How It Works” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0rvFx-C66g

http://www.legalbistro.com Find licensed personal injury attorney North Hollywood California.
If you are looking to legal advice a lawyer in North Hollywood, California to handle your personal injury, our video will help you to better understand how to choose the right law firm for your case.

In our video we are glad to help you understand Comparative Fault Systems better!

The concept of negligence was developed under English Law and emerged as an independent cause of action in the 18th Century. Negligence is defined as “Conduct that falls below the standards of behavior established by law for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of harm”.

Comparative Fault Systems fall into three basic types:

1. Contributory
2. Pure
3. Modified Negligence

Let us introduce some Rules and explain how they work:

a) Pure Contributory Negligence Rule – a damaged party CANNOT recover ANY damages if they are EVEN 1% AT FAULT. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Only five (5) states (Alabama, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia) recognize the Pure Contributory Negligence Rule.

b) Pure Comparative Fault Rule — a damaged party is permitted to recover even if they are 99% at fault. Under this rule, the amount of the recovery would be reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Thirteen (13) states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington) recognize the Pure Comparative Fault Rule.

c) Modified Comparative Fault Rule — there are two different applications of this rule:

50% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 50% or more at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Eleven (11) states (Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) follow the 50% Bar Rule.

51% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 51% or more at fault but can recover if they are 50% or less at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Twenty-One (21) states (Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) follow the 51% Bar Rule.

Need help to figure this all out? For more specific information concerning YOUR case we advise you to address a qualified attorney in the state in which your accident occurred. Search for help on Legal Bistro http://www.legalbistro.com! The service is 100% free for consumers and you remain anonymous throughout the entire process of finding the right lawyer.

Visit our blog on http://blog.legalbistro.com/
See us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legalbistropage
See us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/blogLegalBistro
See us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=211696188&authType=name&authToken=FnxO&trk=wvmx-profile-title
See us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/104548476571730466746/posts
Watch our “Why Consumers Love legal Bistro” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdeffI-LJXs
Watch our “Legal Bistro – How It Works” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0rvFx-C66g
Video Rating: / 5

Peru: The New King of Cocaine (Full Length) – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

The United Nations announced in 2013 that Peru has overtaken Colombia as the world’s top producer of coca, the raw plant material used to manufacture cocaine. For the past two decades, Colombia has been virtually synonymous with cocaine. Now that Peru has become the global epicenter of cocaine production, the Andean nation runs the risk of becoming the world’s next great narco state.

The Peruvian government is trying to crack down on the problem by ramping up eradication of coca plants, and devoting military and police resources to interdiction efforts. Despite the response — and a hefty amount of foreign aid devoted to combatting cocaine production — Peruvian coke is being consumed in the nightclubs of Lima and in cities around the world like never before.

VICE News travels to Peru to learn more about the government’s battle plan against cocaine, and to see how nearly every aspect of Peruvian society is caught up in the fight. We witness how the fine, white powder has forced an entire nation to the brink in the global war on drugs.

Read “Meet the Man Helping Peru’s Foreign Drug Mules Get Home”- http://bit.ly/1qT9i1j

Read “The Opium and Heroin Business Is Booming in Southeast Asia’s ‘Golden Triangle'” – http://bit.ly/1B2tzCe

Read “A Law Designed to Target Coke Lords Is Screwing Over Legal Pot Companies” – http://bit.ly/1ylCr6x

Read “‘Air Cocaine’: Trial Begins for Frenchmen Charged With Smuggling Drugs From the Dominican Republic” – http://bit.ly/1BqeT01

Watch “Rosario: Violence, Drugs and Football (Full Length)” – http://bit.ly/1w2kk6H

Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com

Follow VICE News here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews
Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews
Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/
Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
Video Rating: / 5

http://www.legalbistro.com Retain experienced personal injury law firm Yreka California.
If you are looking to legal advice a lawyer in Yreka, California to handle your personal injury, our video will help you to better understand how to choose the right law firm for your case.

In our video we are glad to help you understand Comparative Fault Systems better!

The concept of negligence was developed under English Law and emerged as an independent cause of action in the 18th Century. Negligence is defined as “Conduct that falls below the standards of behavior established by law for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of harm”.

Comparative Fault Systems fall into three basic types:

1. Contributory
2. Pure
3. Modified Negligence

Let us introduce some Rules and explain how they work:

a) Pure Contributory Negligence Rule – a damaged party CANNOT recover ANY damages if they are EVEN 1% AT FAULT. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Only five (5) states (Alabama, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia) recognize the Pure Contributory Negligence Rule.

b) Pure Comparative Fault Rule — a damaged party is permitted to recover even if they are 99% at fault. Under this rule, the amount of the recovery would be reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Thirteen (13) states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington) recognize the Pure Comparative Fault Rule.

c) Modified Comparative Fault Rule — there are two different applications of this rule:

50% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 50% or more at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Eleven (11) states (Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) follow the 50% Bar Rule.

51% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 51% or more at fault but can recover if they are 50% or less at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Twenty-One (21) states (Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) follow the 51% Bar Rule.

Need help to figure this all out? For more specific information concerning YOUR case we advise you to address a qualified attorney in the state in which your accident occurred. Search for help on Legal Bistro http://www.legalbistro.com! The service is 100% free for consumers and you remain anonymous throughout the entire process of finding the right lawyer.

Visit our blog on http://blog.legalbistro.com/
See us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/legalbistropage
See us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/blogLegalBistro
See us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=211696188&authType=name&authToken=FnxO&trk=wvmx-profile-title
See us on Google+: https://plus.google.com/104548476571730466746/posts
Watch our “Why Consumers Love legal Bistro” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdeffI-LJXs
Watch our “Legal Bistro – How It Works” Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0rvFx-C66g
Video Rating: / 5