Actual Video Footage of Police Officer Michael Slager Planting Evidence on Walter Scott – 844-292-1318 South Carolina legal aid

Please Like and Subscribe

A white South Carolina police officer was arrested and charged with murder Tuesday after video showed him fatally shooting a fleeing, unarmed black man in the back.

North Charleston Police Officer Michael T. Slager, 33, can be seen shooting 50-year-old Walter Scott after a confrontation on Saturday, according to The Post and Courier. Slager chases Scott and shoots at him eight times in the video recorded by a passerby and obtained by The New York Times.

Scott died there, though it wasn’t clear if he died immediately.

The graphic video raises questions about Slager’s original assertion that he used his gun because he felt endangered.

The confrontation started when Slager had reportedly pulled over Scott because of a broken taillight. It escalated into a foot chase as Scott allegedly fled because there were family court-issued warrants for his arrest. Slager pursued Scott into a grassy lot and claimed that he fired his Taser to subdue him.

Moments later, Slager reported on his radio, “Shots fired and the subject is down. He took my Taser,” according to the Times.

Earlier this week, an attorney for Slager said the cop felt threatened after Scott tried to overpower him and take his Taser. Today that attorney told The Post and Courier that he’s “no longer involved” in the case.

But first images in the video are of Slager shooting at Scott as he runs away from him. It also appears that Slager drops the Taser near Scott after he was gunned down, according to The New York Times.

Police reports also say that responding officers performed CPR and delivered medical aid to Scott, but the video shows Scott face down in handcuffs for several minutes after the shooting. Another officer shows up and appears to give Scott aid, but never performs CPR.

Scott had been arrested about 10 times in the past, mostly for failing to pay child support or show up for hearings, according to the paper.

“He has four children, he doesn’t have some type of big violent past or arrest record. He had a job, he was engaged,” a lawyer for Scott’s family told the Times. “He had back child support and didn’t want to go to jail for back child support.”

In a statement released Tuesday night, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley (R) said, “What happened in this case is not acceptable in South Carolina.” Senator Tim Scott (R) said “The senseless shooting and taking of Walter Scott’s life was absolutely unnecessary and avoidable,” adding that he would be watching the case closely.

The shooting in North Charleston comes on the heels of several high-profile cases of police officers using deadly force against unarmed black men in Ferguson, Missouri, Cleveland and New York. This is one of the few times the offending officer has been charged with murder.

“What if there was no video? What if there was no witness? Where would we be without that video,” Justin Bamberg said at a presser with the family on Tuesday night. Bamburg is one of the Scotts’ family attorneys and also represents South Carolina’s House District 90.

Family attorney L. Chris Stewart called the witness who recorded the video a “hero,” saying that video evidence disproved initial reports that Scott reached for the Slager’s Taser. Stewart added that the witness is working with investigators and may eventually come forward.

Bamberg told MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell that the witness contacted the family following the shooting. They were the first to watch the video.

“If there was no video, I do not believe that officer would be in jail,” Bamberg said. “From what the video shows, I think that provides the necessary ammunition to hold this officer accountable.”

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division, a state agency also known as SLED, was later contacted and promptly launched an investigation.

“I don’t think anybody can see that and not see that what that officer did was murder Mr. Scott in cold blood,” Bamberg said. “What would have happened if this witness did not have the courage to stand up and do the right thing and decide that what he witnessed was wrong? I’m glad we don’t have to ponder that.”

Stewart also said that they will file a civil lawsuit. The family urged the public to fight for justice legally instead of through violence.

“We can’t get my brother back,” Scott’s brother Anthony said. “I don’t think all police officers are bad cops, but there are some bad ones out there.”

“I had two brothers, now I have one,” he said tearing up. He recalled his brother as an outgoing man who served in the Coast Guard and was a fan of the Dallas Cowboys.
Video Rating: / 5

The Palmetto State might owe its infamous reputation for dirty political tricks to one man: Republican political operative Lee Atwater.
» Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC
» Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews

NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and our original series Debunker, Flashback, Nerdwatch, and Show Me. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations.

Connect with NBC News Online!
Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC
Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC
Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC
Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC
Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC
Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC

South Carolina: A History Of Dirty Tricks | Long Story Short | NBC News

Ethics Hearing @ CT Supreme Court- Raw Footage 1 – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

http://starkravingviking.blogspot.com/

Ethics Hearing @ CT Supreme Court- Raw Footage 1

Connecticut Judicial Branch Public Service and Trust Committee Members:
* Honorable Alexandra DiPentima, Chair
* Sandra Sosnoff Baird, Family Support Magistrate
* Honorable Robert E. Beach Jr., Appellate Court Judge
* Honorable John D. Boland, Superior Court Judge
* Joseph F. Camilleri, Information Technology Division
* William H. Carbone, Court Support Services Division
* Honorable Patrick L. Carroll, III, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Thomas J. Corradino, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Joseph D. D’Alesio, Superior Court Operations Division
* Honorable Nina F. Elgo, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Melissa A. Farley, Division of External Affairs
* Honorable Roland D. Fasano, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable James T. Graham, Superior Court Judge
* Ms. Lisa Holden, Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence
* Attorney Norman K. Janes, Statewide Legal Services of CT, Inc.
* Honorable Clarance J. Jones, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Kevin T. Kane, Chief State’s Attorney
* Justice Joette Katz, Supreme Court Justice
* Ms. Caren Kittredge, Public Member
* Honorable Sandra Vilardi Leheny, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Douglas C. Mintz, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Joseph Mirrione, Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association
* Attorney William H. Prout Jr., Connecticut Bar Association
* Honorable Barbara M. Quinn, Deputy Chief Court Administrator
* Honorable Kevin A. Randolph, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Antonio C. Robaina, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Kenneth B. Rubin, Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
* Honorable William B. Rush, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Michael T. Ryan, Connecticut Defense Lawyers Association
* Attorney Mary Sommer Sandak, Attorney at Law
* Honorable Dan Shaban, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Joseph Shortall, Superior Court Judge
* Thomas A. Siconolfi, Administrative Services Division
* Carolyn Signorelli, Chief Child Protection Attorney
* Attorney Toni M. Smith-Rosario, Connecticut Hispanic Bar Association
* Attorney Robert Stillman, Representative of the Connecticut Business and Industry Council
* Attorney Susan O. Storey, Chief Public Defender
* Honorable Hillary B. Strackbein, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Frederic S. Ury, Attorney at Law
* Attorney Dawne G. Westbrook, NAACP
* Alex Wood, Journal Inquirer
* Attorney Jennifer Zito, Criminal Defense Association

12-3-07 CT Supreme Court Hearing on Ethics- Raw Footage 2 – 844-292-1318 Connecticut legal aid

12-3-07 CT Supreme Court Hearing on Ethics- Raw Footage 2

12-3-07 CT Supreme Court Hearing on Ethics- Raw Footage 2

http://starkravingviking.blogspot.com/

Connecticut Judicial Branch Public Service and Trust Committee Members:
* Honorable Alexandra DiPentima, Chair
* Sandra Sosnoff Baird, Family Support Magistrate
* Honorable Robert E. Beach Jr., Appellate Court Judge
* Honorable John D. Boland, Superior Court Judge
* Joseph F. Camilleri, Information Technology Division
* William H. Carbone, Court Support Services Division
* Honorable Patrick L. Carroll, III, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Thomas J. Corradino, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Joseph D. D’Alesio, Superior Court Operations Division
* Honorable Nina F. Elgo, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Melissa A. Farley, Division of External Affairs
* Honorable Roland D. Fasano, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable James T. Graham, Superior Court Judge
* Ms. Lisa Holden, Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence
* Attorney Norman K. Janes, Statewide Legal Services of CT, Inc.
* Honorable Clarance J. Jones, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Kevin T. Kane, Chief State’s Attorney
* Justice Joette Katz, Supreme Court Justice
* Ms. Caren Kittredge, Public Member
* Honorable Sandra Vilardi Leheny, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Douglas C. Mintz, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Joseph Mirrione, Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association
* Attorney William H. Prout Jr., Connecticut Bar Association
* Honorable Barbara M. Quinn, Deputy Chief Court Administrator
* Honorable Kevin A. Randolph, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Antonio C. Robaina, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Kenneth B. Rubin, Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
* Honorable William B. Rush, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Michael T. Ryan, Connecticut Defense Lawyers Association
* Attorney Mary Sommer Sandak, Attorney at Law
* Honorable Dan Shaban, Superior Court Judge
* Honorable Joseph Shortall, Superior Court Judge
* Thomas A. Siconolfi, Administrative Services Division
* Carolyn Signorelli, Chief Child Protection Attorney
* Attorney Toni M. Smith-Rosario, Connecticut Hispanic Bar Association
* Attorney Robert Stillman, Representative of the Connecticut Business and Industry Council
* Attorney Susan O. Storey, Chief Public Defender
* Honorable Hillary B. Strackbein, Superior Court Judge
* Attorney Frederic S. Ury, Attorney at Law
* Attorney Dawne G. Westbrook, NAACP
* Alex Wood, Journal Inquirer
* Attorney Jennifer Zito, Criminal Defense Association

This video explains what you can expect when going to court and how you can prepare.

It will review what to wear, preparing documents, child care, who to bring with you, getting to court and going through security, mediation, and how to behave during the hearing.

Original video created by the Connecticut Network for Legal Aid.
Video Rating: / 5

Judge Releases Body Cam Footage Of Louisiana Cops Fatal Shooting Of 6-Year Old Jeremy Mardis – 844-292-1318 Louisiana legal aid

Body camera footage has been released from the night of a fatal officer-involved shooting in Marksville that resulted in the death of a 6-year-old boy and left his father critically wounded.

The highly controversial case has remained sealed, but during a pretrial hearing Wednesday, Judge William Bennett ruled that the footage can be released to the public.

The judge also ruled that the two officers involved and charged in the case, Norris Greenhouse Jr. and Derrick Stafford, will have separate trials after denying a motion filed by the defense.

The shooting happened Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015 around 9:30 p.m. During the hearing prosecutors argued that as the shooting began, Chris Few, the father of the slain child Jeremy Mardis, can be seen with his hands raised.

Parish investigators initially said marshals were chasing Few because of an outstanding warrant. However, WAFB checked with the Clerk of Court, the District Attorney’s Office, Marksville Police Department and City Court and did not find any outstanding warrants. Col. Mike Edmonson said so far, their investigation shows the same.

The shooting was captured by Marksville Police officer Sgt. Kenneth Parnell who said he responded to the pursuit after hearing the call on the radio.

The first few minutes of video released has no audio, so it’s not clear when the first shots are fired. The video does show Few with his hands up and out of the vehicle. When sound does kick in, it is deafening gunfire and sirens.

As the video continues, Parnell can be heard calling in the shooting to dispatch, but it takes about two minutes for anyone to approach the SUV. Another officer can be heard telling Few to show his hands several times.

When officers do approach, it appears they discovery Few’s 6-year-old son Jeremy.

Parnell then walks back to Greenhouse and Stafford; both men’s names are visible on their shirts. It sounds like the Parnell tells them about Jeremy, and Greenhouse appears to respond, “Don’t tell me that, bro.”

It’s also at that point that other officers begin to arrive on scene, and someone asks if Few is armed. Investigators would later confirm that Few was not armed, despite conflicting early reports.

It also takes some time for officers to render aid, asking several times for gloves as Few fell from the car. Seven minutes into the video, the officer goes over to Jeremy’s lifeless body to check for a pulse.

At some point, the video again shows Stafford who asked if Few was hit. Few was injured but survived.

“Man, I didn’t see a kid in the car,” Greenhouse can be heard saying.

During the pretrial hearing, other evidence provided was a testimony by Trooper Rodney Owens, the lead detective on the investigation. He said that out of 18 shells found, 14 came from Stafford’s gun. The other four came from Greenhouse’s gun.

Jeremy Mardis was struck five times and was pronounced dead at the scene.

The trial for Stafford is set for a November 28 and Greenhouse’s trial is scheduled for March 13.
Video Rating: / 5

Access to Affordable Housing for People with Criminal Records

People with criminal records often face obstacles to obtaining affordable housing. They can be denied housing based on arrests without subsequent convictions, old and outdated convictions, or criminal records that have nothing to do with a person’s ability to be a good tenant. In this webinar moderated by the Shriver Center’s Marie Claire Tran-Leung, the presenters shared their experiences using litigation and advocacy to eliminate such barriers to federally subsidized housing and to housing in the private rental market. The presenters were John Relman of Relman, Dane & Colfax PLLC, Fred Fuchs of Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, and Laura Tuggle of Southeast Louisiana Legal Services.
Video Rating: / 5