The Bureau of Indian Affairs – Edward Hall – 844-292-1318 Alaska legal aid

The United States has a unique legal and political relationship with
Indian tribes and Alaska Native entities as provided by the
Constitution of the United States, treaties, court decisions and
Federal statutes. Within the government-to-government relationship, Indian Affairs provides services directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to 566 federally recognized tribes, as Edward Hall, tourism coordinator of The Bureau of Indian Affairs, told us…
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2000 Hall of Fame: Dill, Torres, Crawford: Part 2 – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

2000 Hall of Fame, College of Business, NMSU

Julie A. Dill (’81)

Julie A. Dill received her bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1981. She graduated summa cum laude, with a major in finance.

She is currently the Senior Vice President of Planning and Finance and Chief Financial Officer for Duke Energy International in Houston, Texas. She is responsible for all economic and strategic analysis, planning and all aspects of financial and management accounting and reporting for the international development and asset management unit of Duke Energy.

Before joining Duke in 1998, she worked in various areas of Shell Oil Company.

Ralph G. Torres (’67)

Ralph G. Torres received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1967 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver College of Law in 1970.

He is currently an Attorney at Law in Denver with expertise in employment and labor discrimination and administrative law. Since 1986 he has represented both claimants and management in state and federal courts in Colorado and before state and federal regulatory agencies.

He has worked previously for the Denver district office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Adams County Legal Aid Society.

W. Everett Crawford (’70)

W. Everett Crawford received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1970.

He has worked in the banking and financial field for 29 years. He is currently the Executive Vice President of First National Bank and President and managing Officer of its Mesilla Branch.

Prior to his affiliation with First National in 1996, he spent 20 years at Citizens Bank of Las Cruces, serving eight years as President and Chief Executive Officer.

2000 Hall of Fame: Dill, Torres, Crawford: Part 3 – 844-292-1318 New Mexico legal aid

2000 Hall of Fame, College of Business, NMSU

Julie A. Dill (’81)

Julie A. Dill received her bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1981. She graduated summa cum laude, with a major in finance.

She is currently the Senior Vice President of Planning and Finance and Chief Financial Officer for Duke Energy International in Houston, Texas. She is responsible for all economic and strategic analysis, planning and all aspects of financial and management accounting and reporting for the international development and asset management unit of Duke Energy.

Before joining Duke in 1998, she worked in various areas of Shell Oil Company.

Ralph G. Torres (’67)

Ralph G. Torres received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1967 and his Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver College of Law in 1970.

He is currently an Attorney at Law in Denver with expertise in employment and labor discrimination and administrative law. Since 1986 he has represented both claimants and management in state and federal courts in Colorado and before state and federal regulatory agencies.

He has worked previously for the Denver district office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Adams County Legal Aid Society.

W. Everett Crawford (’70)

W. Everett Crawford received his bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from NMSU in 1970.

He has worked in the banking and financial field for 29 years. He is currently the Executive Vice President of First National Bank and President and managing Officer of its Mesilla Branch.

Prior to his affiliation with First National in 1996, he spent 20 years at Citizens Bank of Las Cruces, serving eight years as President and Chief Executive Officer.
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http://www.legalbistro.com Retain best personal injury attorney Anahuac Texas.
If you are looking to retain an attorney in Anahuac, Texas to handle your personal injury, our video will help you to better understand how to choose the right law firm for your case.

In our video we are glad to help you understand Comparative Fault Systems better!

The concept of negligence was developed under English Law and emerged as an independent cause of action in the 18th Century. Negligence is defined as “Conduct that falls below the standards of behavior established by law for the protection of others against unreasonable risk of harm”.

Comparative Fault Systems fall into three basic types:

1. Contributory
2. Pure
3. Modified Negligence

Let us introduce some Rules and explain how they work:

a) Pure Contributory Negligence Rule – a damaged party CANNOT recover ANY damages if they are EVEN 1% AT FAULT. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Only five (5) states (Alabama, District of Columbia, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia) recognize the Pure Contributory Negligence Rule.

b) Pure Comparative Fault Rule — a damaged party is permitted to recover even if they are 99% at fault. Under this rule, the amount of the recovery would be reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Thirteen (13) states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington) recognize the Pure Comparative Fault Rule.

c) Modified Comparative Fault Rule — there are two different applications of this rule:

50% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 50% or more at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Eleven (11) states (Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and West Virginia) follow the 50% Bar Rule.

51% Bar Rule – a damaged party cannot recover if they are 51% or more at fault but can recover if they are 50% or less at fault. Under this application, the recovery amount is reduced by the damaged party’s degree of fault. (Watch our video for examples)

NOTE: Twenty-One (21) states (Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) follow the 51% Bar Rule.

Need help to figure this all out? For more specific information concerning YOUR case we advise you to address a qualified attorney in the state in which your accident occurred. Search for help on Legal Bistro http://www.legalbistro.com! The service is 100% free for consumers and you remain anonymous throughout the entire process of finding the right lawyer.

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