Venice and the Ottoman Empire: Crash Course World History #19 – 844-292-1318 legal aid Florence Alabama

In which John Green discusses the strange and mutually beneficial relationship between a republic, the citystate of Venice, and an Empire, the Ottomans–and how studying history can help you to be a better boyfriend and/or girlfriend. Together, the Ottoman Empire and Venice grew wealthy by facilitating trade: The Venetians had ships and nautical expertise; the Ottomans had access to many of the most valuable goods in the world, especially pepper and grain. Working together across cultural and religious divides, they both become very rich, and the Ottomans became one of the most powerful political entities in the world. We also discuss how economic realities can overcome religious and political differences (in this case between Muslims and Christians), the doges of Venice, the sultans of the Ottoman empire, the janissaries and so-called slave aristocracy of the Ottoman Empire, and how money and knowledge from the Islamic world helped fuel and fund the European Renaissance. Also, there’s a They Might Be Giants joke.

If you really want to read about Ottoman eunuchs (warning: it’s explicit), here you go: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eunuch#Ottoman_Empire

Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set

Follow us!
@thecrashcourse
@realjohngreen
@raoulmeyer
@crashcoursestan
@saysdanica
@thoughtbubbler

Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse
Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com
Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse
Video Rating: / 5

An Examination of Hispanic and Latino History – 844-292-1318 Missouri legal aid

An Examination of Hispanic and Latino History

As part of their Documented Rights Exhibit, the National Archives at St. Louis hosted a distinguished panel of scholars and legal experts to discuss the historical significance of documents from the Hernandez v. Corpus Christi, Texas (1959) case. A sampling of these case documents are featured in the Documented Rights exhibition. This case involves discrimination against children with Spanish surnames who were required to attend Spanish language speaking public schools, even though they could not speak Spanish.

The panel was moderated by attorney and immigration law professor Dr. Richard T. Middleton at the University of Missouri at St. Louis. Legal experts John Ammann (St. Louis University Civil Advocacy Clinic), Kenneth K. Schmitt (U.S. Legal Solutions, LLC & Missouri Kansas Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association), and Kristine Walentik (Catholic Immigration Law Project) were among the evening’s speakers.

The panelists examined how the Hernandez case impacts current immigration law in Missouri and other parts of the United States. Attorney’s Ammann and Schmitt also discussed recent legislation surrounding Missouri’’s current debate over the implementation of an English-only driver’s exam. Meanwhile, Kristine Walentik shared information on free legal aid available to immigrants who qualify.

Contact the National Archives at St. Louis Public Programming at 314-801-0487 or Wanda Williams at 314-801-9313 for more information.
Video Rating: / 5

Combs, Carmen – Audio Oral History Interview – CSWA – 844-292-1318 Iowa legal aid

Interviewed by Elizabeth McBroom on August 14, 1990.

An interview with Carmen Combs as she discusses her early childhood in Iowa; graduation from Yale School of Law in 1927; early law practice; work at USC in Legal Aid Clinic; work with “Okie” families; referee in juvenile courts in Los Angeles area; House of Good Shepherd and Boys Republic; detention of children at McClaren Hall; appointment from Earl Warren to city’s advisory committee; career with League of Women Voters and issues addressed; involvement with grand jury investigations; “Woman of the Year” award; volunteer for Pasadena School District; work with League of Women Voters and its involvement with migrant workers; philosophy as working mother; changes in child welfare and lives of children; effectiveness of social welfare agencies in working with juvenile delinquents; opinion of probation officers.

Carmen Combs was an attorney who spent a number of years as a referee in the Juvenile Court of Los Angeles. She also was an active volunteer in various committees and organizations that focused on juvenile justice and related issues. Among her activities was work with the Legal Aid Society, Los Angeles; the University of Southern California Center on Law and Poverty; the Governor’s (Warren) Committee on Juvenile Justice; the League of Women Voters; and the Boys’ and Girls’ Republic. This interview describes some of her activities in these organizations.

To view a transcript of the interview, visit https://libraries.usc.edu/california-social-welfare-archives-oral-history-catalog

The California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA), established in 1979, is a non-profit organization operating under the auspices of the USC School of Social Work and affiliated with the University Libraries. It collects and preserves documents and personal histories of significant contributions to the evolution of social welfare ensuring their availability to future generations — students, teachers, historians, and researchers. Collection activity includes gathering and archiving social welfare materials of historical significance, conducting oral history interviews with contributors to social welfare solutions in California, and creating events to publicly recognize significant contributors to California social welfare.

Visit us at http://www.usc.edu/libraries/archives/arc/libraries/cswa and http://www.socialworkhallofdistinction.org. The California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA), established in 1979, is a non-profit organization operating under the auspices of the USC School of Social Work and affiliated with the University Libraries. It collects and preserves documents and personal histories of significant contributors to the evolution of social welfare ensuring their availability to future generations – students, teachers, historians, and researchers. Collection activity includes gathering, preserving, and making available social welfare materials of historical significance, conducting oral history interviews with contributors to social welfare solutions in California, and creating events to publicly recognize significant contributors to California social welfare.

Visit us at http://www.usc.edu/cswa and http://www.socialworkhallofdistinction.org

Georgia Disability History Symposium, October 19, 2016 – 844-292-1318 Georgia legal aid

Georgia Disability History Symposium, October 19, 2016

Recorded October 19, 2016 at the UGA Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building.

For more information on the Georgia Disability History Alliance, please visit: http://historyofdisability.com/

Program:

0:06 — Welcome – Sheryl Vogt, Director of the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies

4:47 — Lynne Smith of the RESPECT Institute, a personal story of recovery.

14:48 — Keynote – Dr. Kim E. Nielsen, Professor of Disability Studies, History, and Women’s and Gender Studies, University of Toledo

51:46 — Panel: Catalyst for System Reform in Georgia’s Recent History
– Moderator: Cynthia Wainscott, former member, National Council on Disability
– Sue Jamieson, IHDD Disability Law Project, University of Georgia
– Stan Jones, partner, Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough; chair of SB 811 Commission
– Rev. Mark Baker, former director, Office of Recovery Transformation, Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities
– Talley Wells, IHDD Disability Law Project, University of Georgia; director, Disability Integration Project at Atlanta Legal Aid

1:38:42 — Remembrance of Annette Bowling – Zolinda Stoneman, Institute of Human Development and Disability, University of Georgia

1:48:29 – Panel: Looking Ahead
– Moderator: Ellyn Jeager, The Advocacy Connection
– Yaasmeen Rhett-Nyjah, founder, Kids LIke Moses Advocacy, Inc.
– Cheryl Holt, former Director of Integrated Healthcare, Cobb Community Service Board
– Rep. Pat Gardner, Georgia House District 57
– Rep. Katie Dempsey, Georgia House District 13
– Jen Banathy, Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network

2:42:18 — Story of the Mental Health Bell – Cynthia Wainscott

Georgia Disability History Symposium, October 23, 2015. – 844-292-1318 Georgia legal aid

Recorded October 23, 2015, at the UGA Richard B. Russell Special Collections Libraries Building.

For more information on the Georgia Disability History Alliance, please visit: http://historyofdisability.com/

Program:

0:07 — Welcome – Sheryl Vogt, Director of the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies

8:29 — Keynote – Dr. Zolinda Stoneman, Director of the Institute on Human Development and Disability, UGA

40:30 — Short Film: Campaign for Full Citizenship (1991), by Laura Kissel; introduced by Mat Darby. To view the film please visit: https://archive.org/details/campaignforfullcitizenship

49:50 –Panel: Stories from Georgia Disability History Archive
– Mark Johnson, Director of Advocacy, Shepherd Center
– Tom Kohler, Coordinator and Executive Director, Chatham-Savannah Citizen Advocacy
– Shelly Simmons, Assistant Director, Statewide Independent Living Council of Georgia
– Eleanor Smith, founder of Concrete Change

2:19:41 — Refusing to Give Up: The Power of Legal Advocacy, Sue Jamison, Atlanta Legal Aid Society (topic: The Olmstead Decision and Implications for Disability Rights in America)

For more information on related collections, please visit: http://purl.libs.uga.edu/russell/RBRLGDHA/findingaid
Video Rating: / 5

Watch this student video about Hope Fellow experiences in 2011 in Namibia, Africa, in Atlanta Georgia at the Georgia Justice Project and in Miami, Florida at Legal Aid.
Video Rating: / 5

Equal Justice: the History of The Legal Aid Society – 844-292-1318 New York legal aid

Equal Justice: the History of The Legal Aid Society

http://www.legal-aid.org Equal Justice: the History of The Legal Aid Society, narrated by E.G.Marshall, tells the story of the founding of The Legal Aid Society in 1876 as the first organization in the country to offer free legal services to poor German immigrants. It traces the growth of The Legal Aid Society through the decades as services were extended to all New Yorkers in need of legal services and outlines the support the organization received from prominent figures such as Theodore Roosevelt, first as the New York City Police Commissioner and continued to his years as President of the United States and Charles Evans Hughes, a United States Supreme Court Justice, Governor of New York, and founder and partner of Hughes, Hubbard & Reed LLP. As New York City grew, so too did The Legal Aid Society and the scope of its work to include quality comprehensive representation in three major areas: Civil, Criminal and Juvenile Rights through individual representation and law reform advocacy.
Video Rating: / 5

Morgan Ruthman on the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York

Video Rating: / 5

Vlog: Improving strap; history; Legal Aid no help; LaborMAX; Water Park; Boise Bicycle; Idaho – 844-292-1318 Idaho legal aid

I’m a little disappointed in Legal Aid. I don’t see anything they can help me with.

service, help, principles, community legal clinic, payment, court system, justice, equality, counsel, fair trial, convention, human rights, criminal law, financial, legal representation, fair trial, Commonwealth, cost, welfare state, provision, social housing, economic, social, culture, social security, housing, social care, health, education, squat strap,

via YouTube Capture